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Piquet case: our “neguinho” is not their “nigger”. Never was. not far

Neguinho watched the interview of former F1 racer Nelson Piquet. Neguinho followed the repercussions, especially from Lewis Hamilton, who turned the expression into an insult. Neguinho read notes after notes of solidarity with Hamilton. Neguinho even took pity on Piquet’s cancellation – who he doesn’t like and has never liked. Then neguinho opened the computer and started writing a text on the subject.

The control of language, as we know, is at the heart of the identity movement. Who, in addition to being resentful and deeply unhappy, is ignorant. We have already seen this in the case of the verb “to denigrate” and in the case of the nice piece of furniture called “mute-servant” – which did not give a peep about the matter. With no brakes other than a conscience eaten away by ideology, however, the racialist movement has now found another word for its Index Prohibitorum: “neguinho”.

I don’t know if it’s my angelic ears, but I’ve always heard “neguinho ” as a term of endearment to refer to someone whose name at the time eludes us. I already know! It is characteristic of our diminutives, commonly identified with the innocent speech of children (apud José Paulo Paes, Mário Quintana, etc). Take a lion, so imposing and magnanimous that it even contains an augmentative in the name, and turn it into a little lion to see what happens.

“Neguinho” has nothing, absolutely nothing, zero, –

,15 °C to do with skin color. At worst, “neguinho” is a colloquial indefinite pronoun that can even be used to make references to notorious racists like Che Guevara. “The indolent and dreamy Negro spends his little money on any frivolity or amusement,” said neguinho. Or “neguim”, in its even more indolent version.

Tom e toada

In this toada, it won’t take long for activists criminalize the word “nêga”, used throughout Brazil to refer to the woman they love, regardless of skin color. And I won’t doubt anything if the black movement joins feminists to, together, criminalize the “minha nêga” – a “possessive” classic immortalized in countless songs, by Paulinho da Viola and Adoniran Barbosa. Speaking of music, please, someone rushes to protect “Preta Pretinha” before the song is taken off streaming platforms under pressure from these nerds.

Ah, Paulo, but the problem is the tone with which Nelson Piquet speaks the “neguinho” – someone argues. True, although half true. Because tone is such an elusive thing. Uncontrollable. The tone with which a word is heard/read is not always related to the tone with which it is said/written. Depending on the tone, positive words like “genius” can turn into offense – without ever becoming crimes, let alone hate. Take the statement “Polzonoff is a real genius”, for example. It is very likely that I read it as a compliment, but you wrote/said it as an insult.

Now, the magic: negative words and expressions can turn into displays of affection. As Professor Élio Antunes taught me long ago 27 years ago, you can very well say to a dear friend “come here, you efedepê, give me a hug!”. Or you can get a well-deserved raise, turn to your boss and say, without fear of being fired for just cause: “Boss, I hate you ! Thank you very much”. A few years ago, by the way, he had a narrator reprimanded for saying that Lady Gaga was “ridiculous”. In detail, “you ridiculous” was his catchphrase for wonderful plays in American football.

Bold

In the specific case of “neguinho ” mentioned by Nelson Piquet, the reaction of runner/activist Lewis Hamilton and other personalities with the wind in their heads was to equate the word with “nigger”, a term banned for many years in English. This is the problem with being a stupid millionaire woke celebrity: there’s always a malicious aide to blow into the ear of demigods true-sounding lies that she, the celebrity, will propagate until they reach disturbingly fertile ears when it comes to harmful ideas. .

“Neguinho” and “nigger” are like water and oil. The first, I’ve already said, but it’s worth repeating, has an affectionate touch inherent to the diminutive and has absolutely nothing nothing nothing nothing nothing (nothing!) to do with skin color. “Neguinho” even applies to me. And the Indians and the pardos and the Japanese. “Aquele neguinho whitequelo” is not, in Portuguese, a contradiction in terms. On the other hand, “nigger” carries a very heavy and specific burden of North American English. So much so that the term is practically untranslatable, although some may opt for “criôlo” – said and written like this with the closed “o” and without the “u” – or the rarely used “tição”.

See how curious: instead of celebrating the fact that our language does not have a pejorative term of wide use to refer to a specific race, the black movement invents a false equivalence to widen the abyss of intolerance and, thus, promote its cause. We say “neguinho” as we also say “japa” – without any trace of the hatred contained, for example, in the English word “jap”. Look how wonderful!

And here I will write in bold, before they also ban the graphic mark that helps us to emphasize something: living the identity nightmare, a nightmare marked by scenes of envy, resentment, historical rancor and an unhappiness deeper than the Mariana Trench, is a matter of choice. Which may even be profitable for the Hamiltons and Djamilas of life, but which will probably only bring harm to ordinary and normal people . Speaking of normality, I’ve also written this, but it doesn’t hurt to repeat: to get out of the asylum, sometimes you just open the door.

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