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Argentina recognizes responsibility in the Inter-American Court for attack against AMIA

Argentina acknowledged this Friday (14) before the Inter-American Court of Human Rights (IACHR) its responsibility for the attack on the headquarters of the Associação Mutual Israelita Argentina (AMIA), who left 85 dead in 1994.

“I come on behalf of the Argentine Republic to ratify the recognition of its international responsibility contained in the Decree 812 of 2005 for the violation of the human rights of the victims of the attack”, said Natalia D’Alessandro, coordinator of the AMIA Special Unit, linked to the Ministry of Justice and Human Rights in Argentina.

D’Alessandro said this at the end of the hearing in the case of Associação Civil Memória Ativa v Argentina, which took place in Montevideo, where the Inter-American Court held its 153 th regular session.

“The Argentine State is responsible for the violation of the rights to life, personal integrity and non-discrimination for not having prevented an attack on the which 85 people died and at least 21 were injured,” he added.

In turn, the president of the Inter-American Court, the Uruguayan judge Ricardo Pérez Manrique, said that this body is acting because the Argentine State has not yet held accountable the perpetrators of the terrorist act.

“We all know that a judgment of the court will take a time that we cannot estimate, that we will try to shorten as much as possible (…). I conclude my remarks by asking the State not to wait for the court’s ruling to begin generating concrete facts. It seems to me that this would be the best result of this hearing”, he highlighted.

According to information provided by the Inter-American Court, the case judged in Montevideo was related to the alleged international responsibility of the Argentine State in relation to the attack.

“It is argued that the State knew of the existence of a risk situation in places identified with the Argentine Jewish community”, pointed out a document delivered days ago.

Occurred on the morning of 18 in July 1994, the attack against the Associação Mutual Israelita Argentina left 85 dead and more than 300 injured.

That day, a car bomb destroyed the AMIA headquarters in the Once district of Buenos Aires, in a attack which, although attributed to members of the then government of Iran and the Lebanese Islamic organization Hezbollah, has so far not been arrested or convicted, although several international arrest warrants are still in force.

This case, another against A Argentina and one against Peru are being discussed in public hearings by the Inter-American Court of Human Rights during its 153th regular session, which will take place in Uruguay until 812 of October.

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